Saturday, August 28, 2010

Promoting the Vizsla as a High Class Bird Dog


Bailey has now been gone a little over two months in professional training with Randy Berry. Next weekend Bailey will enter his first Open Gun Dog trial in the Northwest German Shorthair Club trial.  This is the start of Bailey's "campaign" to become a field champion.  Is he among the best?  We'll see.  He'll be running against some of the best.  In two weeks I fly up to Madras, Oregon to attend that weekend's field trial.

Below is a partial write up by one of the most respected people in the Vizsla community.

Ray Cooper -- Co-Founder of the National Vizsla Association

WHY RUN VIZSLAS IN AMERICAN FIELD TRIALS?
Here’s how and why:

1. By competing in trials against breeds that are considered
the best, one gains a perspective on what is needed is his own dogs.

This helps to prevent kennel blindness.
If you see what your dogs need in order to
win, you will be far more selective in your breeding
 program or when selecting a pup.

2. As you select the best of the best from your breed you
 automatically encourage improvement and
discourage complacency.
 If you know either the sire or dam 
 you are considering for breeding stock isn’t capable of
beating the best you are going to look elsewhere.

3. As the product of better breeding begins to perform and
win against the breeds considered to be the best,
 not only does your attitude change,
 but so it does in the minds of those you’re competing against.

4. As these better Vizslas begin to win more often, you attract others
 to your breed who have the same desires as yourself.

5. As you attract more bird dog fanciers they in turn only breed
the best to the best and you begin to see more improvement yet.

6. Over time the breed improvement benefits from this continued momentum.

This can only happen in an arena of purists.

As long as there is a diversion of interest there will be a dilution of quality.

 If you are trying to have a do everything dog,
 you may very well wind up with a do nothing dog.

By running in American Field trials you are competing
 in a world of bird dog purists.

 They don’t give a hoot about which dog won last weekends
best in show. They aren’t interested in hearing that your dog
can catch a Frisbee and jump over a stick.

While they may be polite about it, they are thinking why
 do those people care about that?

If you love the bird dog in your Vizsla, then you owe it to yourself and
your dog to go up against the best.

Find out how you stack up.
You may be surprised, just as many Vizsla owners have been,
when you bring home the blue.

 You may be disappointed at first. One thing you will know is what
you’ve got and what it’s going to take to win.

If you have the desire and the dedication you can have an impact on the trials you
 run in, the people you compete against and the breed you love.

If you would like to learn more about running in
American Field trials, instead of taking someone else’s word for it,
go to their website (http://www.americanfield.com/)
or subscribe to their weekly magazine.

You will see that there are trials all over the country and
 probably some near you on nice grounds.

Go to some, run a dog or two and meet the people. 
You will find a world of people completely dedicated to

bird dogs, their preservation and improvement.
 You may take a little ribbing because you don’t have aPointer or Setter, I sure have.

But that only makes it sweeter when they hand you the trophy.

A good Vizsla can compete against any breed.

A mediocre Vizsla can beat other mediocre Vizslas on any given weekend.

You decide which you would rather have.



2 comments:

Radar Red Dog said...

We'll be thinking about you next weekend Bailey...go get 'em...good luck!! Juliet, John & your bird dog cousins Radar & Rio

Andrew Campbell said...

Good luck, Buddy! Madras is quite a spot... have never trialed there, but did live in OR for three years. Can't wait to hear about your experience.

Incidentally, keep in mind that Ray is talking about American Field trials, as opposed to American field trials. There's plenty of opinions in the dog world, but Ray also has almost thirty years of breeding and trialing experience to back his up.

all best
Andrew