Friday, September 9, 2016

Beyond Hope Resort Idaho Loved Bailey and Chloe

Sam Owen National Park lies 3 miles east of the town of Hope, Idaho.  This was our dry camping spot for the first week of our Northern Idaho adventure. The skies were overcast the first few days and we even got a little overnight rain one night.  Nothing much.
At $22 per day, the park is a top pick for vacationers from the Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Alberta.
The shores along Lake Pend Oreille ( pronounced Ponderay) were wonderful during August.  We arrived on a Monday afternoon. Even making reservations two months prior over the internet, we could not stay at the park over the weekend as it was fully booked.
So we moved 1/4 mile for the weekend to Beyond Hope Resort.  This is a nice resort for camping and RVs.  There is electricity and water and WiFi so we felt we were in civilization, but a bit pricey at $50 per night.  Great place and time of year.  Very dog friendly area.
Sunset over Beyond Hope.
Great trails all around the resort and San Owens that were off-leash wonderlands.  A deer, turkey or quail got exercised each hike by two happy Vizslas running happily through the woods..

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Red Bird Dogs at Priest Lake Idaho

August in the very tip of Idaho 2016 was special to our little band.  We enjoyed five glorious days of sunshine, wonderful water, beautiful forests and QUIET. 
The next few posts will be some pictures of our 2,614 round trip to some fantastic spots in Idaho.  Priest Lake is the farthest north lake in the state.  You can see Canada from there.

  I didn't spend much time with a camera but we did miles of hiking and even some canoeing.

 If I died and woke up in Heaven, would I be on Priest Lake in August?  I'd be ok with that.

Sunday, September 4, 2016

The Very Rare Transylvanian Hound



 Over the last 4 years that I have known about the other royal Hungarian hunting dog besides the Vizsla, I have been a fan of the breed. The Transylvanian Hound.  If you search the name you will find several posts about the breed.  Here is from my friend Maria about a rare breeding in the mid-west of this uncommon dog breed.

"Just in case you  know of someone would like a Transylvanian Hound of their own, I thought I should let you know about these babies…and quick before they are all gone! They are in Indianapolis, but if someone in CA is interested, I will bring a puppy back for them. Since so many people read your blog, there may be people in the mid-west who may be interested too. This is Rommy’s first litter and at 3.5 years old, she is a great mama. Nancy Elder, her owner, doesn’t intend to breed her again, so I don’t know when there will be another litter born someplace other than CA. 

Nancy has been doing a wonderful job with the puppies too! They are being lovingly and carefully raised and trained by Nancy along with their parents Rommy (“Anika”) of Californian Transylvanian (from our Jan 2013 litter) and Iv√≥ of California Transylvanian (born in Romania). Nancy, like we do here, has been involved with raising and training the puppies since they were  born. They started with early neurological training from just a few days old, helping them to develop into more versatile and resilient dogs. They have been very well socialized, are being crate trained, car trained, potty trained, leash trained and trained in basic manners and skills. Someone is with them all the time to ensure their safety as well. 

These exceptional puppies are getting ready to move to their new homes. If anyone is interested in them please have them contact either me, or Nancy Elder at 317-695-1182 or nvelder50@me.com for additional information. More pictures of the puppies are available on our California Transylvanian Hounds website  www.californinatransylvanian.com or on FaceBook at the Transylvanian Hound Club."

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

A Different View of Dogs - India



 This weekend, as Chetan and Shwetha (both from India originally) hiked along with me in the hills overlooking the East Bay, with their wonderful 5-month-old pup, Rocky.  The discussion came up, as we hiked, of the seeming fear of off-leash dogs when we come across hikers from India.  The viewpoint shared was very enlightening.  I will "leash-up" Bailey and Chloe, when in doubt, for everyone's well being.

"Regarding the insight of pet/dog culture in India, it's largely to do with the fact that, most parts of India have large numbers of stray dogs (on almost every street). Because of that, almost every other person (including Shwetha and myself) have been attacked and bitten by several stary dogs. They form groups and define their own territory and boundary. Every night, you sleep to the sound of dogs barking, which is common. Some of them also chase bikes, cars and bicycles when they are in their boundary. In some cases, for no reason, they even attack people and bite them leading to the ugly process of injections (those that we had to take to our stomach, 14 injections OUCH!!) etc. Several instances, even pet owners, raise their dogs to be specifically aggressive because most owners want their pets to alert them if any strangers that enter or pass by their house/property. But poor pouch has no idea who is who, when it comes to a stranger and they end up barking/attacking almost every unknown person. 



Consequently, having grown up in such an environment, where we have to sometimes change a walk route to avoid a certain street dog, we end up being nervous coming across any dog. Its kind of physiologically biased reaction. The first instinct for many Indians is that a dog may bite them and so they probably won't be a fan and will tend to be nervous of off-the-leash dogs here is the United States.  This is many times misunderstood between cultures.  



However, pet culture in U.S. has completely changed our frame of mind. I feel so lucky for having access to resources, knowledge about pets in general, and hands on experience with our friend's dogs (here in U.S.). Vs in particular, being the sweetest of all breeds have transformed our biases. Very quickly our V showed us a new word of coexisting together with purest form of love and affection. We have a long way to go, and hopefully in this process we also influence pet/dog culture back in India (at least a few) starting with our own relatives and friends :) 



Thank you so much Rod for everything. Hope to see Chloe next time, very soon!